Baradine: Small Town, Big Heart

Zac Broughton, Braiden Jones, Riley Porter and dad Ben Broughton drive from Cobar to Baradine.

Ben Broughton drives from Cobar to deliver Zac Broughton, Braiden Jones and Riley Porter to Moorambilla in Baradine.

 

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The small town of Baradine, home to the Pilliga Forest, opened its heart again to the incredibly angelic sound of young boys voices today as Moorambilla regional boys choir took up residence. The boys have a lot of work to do preparing for the Gala Concert in Coonamble in September. 

Camp Cypress is again home for three days to over 50 boys from all over the north west of NSW, from Bourke to Gadooga, Dubbo to Brewarrina, Dunedoo to Grawin – as it has been for the past nine years.

Camp Manager Dot Thompson welcomes the boys.

Camp Manager Dot Thompson welcomes the boys.

For the next three days the boys are going to create magic in the fields of music, dance and visual arts – in ways they have never experienced before! Many of the boys are coming for the first time, but many choose to come back time again for the special Moorambilla experience.

Moorambilla Voices is more than a program about country kids learning about artistic expression, it’s a program that helps them find their voice, their passion and even their path for the future.  Find out more and how you can help make this happen at http://www.moorambilla.com

2.Baradine hall

The Baradine community has embraced the program ever since it began nine years ago in 2005, when local residents Liz Markey, Justine Lawler and Michelle Leonard from Coonamble started a boys treble choir that would celebrate the incredible creative energy of the north west region. It was a regional first, and has grown from strength to strength.

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Baradine resident and long-time community advocate Nea Worrell – has been a linchpin of the Moorambilla Voices program. Alongside Veronica ‘Ronnie’ Halcomb, Nea provides the essential catering for the children at camp and during rehearsal. She also provides extensive commentary, etiquette, and old fashioned country hospitality.

5. Nea

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Today the boys had their first taste of camp, working Artistic Director Michelle Leonard, composer Alice Chance, accompanist Ben Burton and Queensland Ballet EdSquad dancer Jacob Williams. This year’s theme is Earth and Sky. The boys began to create pieces around the Indigenous legends of Pallah Pallah, the word for butterfly in the Ngemba language, or Balla-Ballaa, in Yuwaalaraay language. This is the story of how the Opal was created from butterfly wings. The boys read the story of Pallah Pallah and thought about how dance creates meaning without language and how to manipulate dance ideas. The children began to explore choreography, even though many of them had not even heard the word before.

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As Jacob starts to unpack how he will work with the festival theme, Indigenous artist Frank Wright and textile artist Fiona Fagan began to sketch out the concert backdrop which focuses on the Emu in the Sky story.

7. Frnak and Fiona

Everyone had an early night ready for tomorrow’s full day!

Text and photography: Lliane Clarke

Donate now! Moorambilla Voices is more than a program about country kids learning about artistic expression, it’s a program that helps them find their voice, their passion and even their path for the future.  Find out more and how you can help make this happen at http://www.moorambilla.com

 

 

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